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Teething Do’s and Don’ts

The lower incisors, the first baby teeth to erupt, come out at around six months.

It can be a pain not just to your little baby, but for the whole family as well. It practically leaves everyone in dire need for relief. That time calls best cosmetic dentist today.

There’s drooling, crying, and difficulty sleeping that often throws you in the loop. As a parent, you are often left wondering what you can do to make your little one’s pain go away.

Luckily, there are a lot of remedies that promise to soothe your infant’s sensitive gums, but not all of them are reliable. Here are some of the best – and worst – ideas.

PAIN RELIEF

Do:

Massage your baby’s gums. After washing your hands, use your fingers to gently rub your baby’s gums.

It is a great way to relieve pain, while also making your little one more accustomed to the feel of brushing in his/her mouth.

Give a proper dose of pain relievers. If your tot is having difficulty falling asleep or wakes up in the middle of the night due to teething, then you may consider giving him/her some mild pain relievers like paracetamol.

Ideally, you should consult with the pediatrician but if it is some sort of emergency, be sure to use the medications sparingly and follow the instructions closely to avoid any unwanted reactions.

Don’t:

Use topical anesthetics. Gels containing local anesthetics like lidocaine and benzocaine seem like a quick fix, but they actually an absolute no-no.

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Anesthetics are toxic to infants and very young children. They can lead to serious side effects like brain damage, seizures, and worst – death.

Benzocaine, which is more commonly available as Baby Orajel, potentially causes a rare serious condition called methemoglobinemia.

Use teething tablets. Just a couple of years ago, the US FDA issued warning against a particular brand of the teething tablet due to its potential side effects.

To be sure, avoid using any form of teething tablets for your little one.

Use pain relievers on infants below four months. Children under four months are more prone to serious adverse reactions from pain relievers.

If medications are absolutely needed, consult a pediatrician first before giving him/her any medicine.

INFLAMMED GUMS

Do:

Give a teething ring to bite on. Teething babies love to chew on things because it can somehow relieve the discomfort caused by their inflamed gums. A cold teething ring will do just that.

Have your kid chew on a cold washcloth. If you don’t have a teething ring lying around, this is a much simpler, yet equally effective trick.

Put the damp washcloth in the refrigerator for about 30 minutes, being careful not to freeze it. And be sure that the cloth is made from safe materials and that your kid does the chewing under supervision.

Also, watch out for any tears and holes, and replace the cloth if any.

Don’t:

Give liquid-filled teething rings.

This kind may leak or break over time and cause you, child, to ingest potentially dangerous materials. And while cold teething rings feel good, remember to avoid freezing them because they can hurt your kid’s already sensitive gums.

DROOLING

Do:

Keep a dry washcloth handy. This is so you can dry all the excess saliva that has pooled on your baby’s chin.

Teething involves a lot of drooling here and there so you always have to have a cloth nearby.

Apply a protective coating on your baby’s skin. Try using Vaseline and apply it onto your kid’s cheek and chin before putting him to sleep.

This will help protect your baby’s skin.

It is particularly beneficial if your baby has a sensitive skin that develops “drool rash” upon contact with saliva.

The appearance of your baby’s little teeth is such an amazing milestone. And while the process of teething can be stressful for you and your baby, it is a step closer to a wonderful smile.

Be sure to take great care of your kid’s teeth by cleaning it twice daily and paying a visit to your pediatric best cosmetic dentist.