Top 5 Foods that Help Bust Bad Breath

We all know how foods like onion and garlic cause bad breath due to the pungent oils they produce. Fortunately, there are also foods that have the opposite effect. These foods can help bust bad breath, but only temporarily – like an hour or two. Nonetheless, this is already enough time until you are able to do something about the real cause – the odor-causing bacteria in the mouth.

Green Tea

We are all aware of the many health benefits green tea has, so it is not surprising that this wonder beverage can also fight bad breath. The bad breath-fighting ability of green tea is attributed to the chemical called cathecin. Cathecin is a powerful antioxidant that helps fight the bacteria that causes the foul odor. This compound is effective not only against odor-causing bacteria, but also against other harmful bacteria in the mouth.

In fact, according to some sources, green tea is more effective than mints in masking bad breath.

In addition to fighting bacteria, green can also reduce the amounts of volatile sulfur compounds in the mouth, which is the actual cause of the bad breath.

Parsley

Parsley is another popular remedy to bad breath, next only to green tea. Its odor-fighting ability is due to a compound called chlorophyll, which is found mostly in green and leafy plants. Chlorophyll has a strong scent that follows the sulfur compounds all the way to the bloodstream and lungs, thereby masking the smell when you breathe.

Yogurt

Yogurt contains live cultures of good bacteria that can effectively combat the bad bacteria that cause foul breath. In addition, it can neutralize the volatile sulfur compounds, particularly hydrogen sulfide, produced by these bad bacteria. But to be more effective, you have to consume one that’s free of sugar.

Fibrous Fruits and Vegetables

Fibrous fruits help get rid of bad breath by mechanically removing bacteria much like brushing does. They also stimulate the production of saliva which helps wash away the odor-producing bacterial by-products. Apples, pears, carrots, celery, and cucumbers are the most effective for this purpose.

Nuts

Nuts like almonds and walnuts work in pretty the same way as your fibrous fruits and vegetables because they are also loaded with fiber. Likewise, they are also rich in omega-3 fatty acids which can help reduce the amount of bacteria in the mouth.

Take note that while the foods listed above are effective in masking foul breath, they should not, in any way, be a substitute to your oral hygiene practices. The solution they provide is only temporary. The more permanent solution is (and always will be) brushing and flossing your teeth at least twice a day. When brushing your teeth, be sure to brush your tongue as well because it is where odor-causing bacteria thrive the most.

Furthermore, visit your dentist regularly for checkups and professional cleaning. If you’re bad breath remains persistent, your dentist will refer you to a medical doctor because the foul odor could be a sign of something else.

Things You Should Know About Toothpastes

toothpaste. This toothbrush buddy comes in many forms, and they contain different ingredients. There are ordinary toothpastes, and there are ones formulated for your special needs. Learn more about this oral health goodie below.

What is Toothpaste Made up of?

Different toothpastes contain different list of ingredients, but the general components include the following:

  • Abrasives – along with your toothbrush, aid in the mechanical removal of debris and surface stains.

  • Fluoride – makes the teeth stronger by rendering it more resistant to the acids produced by decay-causing bacteria.

  • Humectant – retains water and prevents your toothpaste from drying out and getting lumpy or gummy.

  • Detergent – acts as foaming agent that helps spread the toothpaste around the mouth; it also has some cleaning action.

  • Binder – thickening agent; it helps stabilize and hold the toothpaste formula together.

  • Flavoring Agents – add some sweetness and scent to your toothpaste, making it more pleasant to use.

Why are Some Toothpaste More Expensive than Others?

Even though they have the same basic ingredients, not all toothpastes are created equal. Depending on the type of toothpaste, some special ingredients are added for increased benefits, hence the higher price. These include ingredients that are especially formulated for tartar control, whitening, and relief of sensitivity. More often than not, the most expensive toothpastes are the ones for sensitivity.

What are the Different Types of Toothpastes?

Toothpastes are classified based on what oral health problem they were formulated for. These types include:

  • Fluoride Toothpastes – these are your ordinary toothpastes which are formulated to fight and prevent tooth decay. As the name suggests, the main ingredient is fluoride. Fluoride strengthens the enamel and makes it less susceptible to tooth decay. And if tooth decay is already there, fluoride toothpastes may also aid in the arresting the decay process.

  • Tartar Control Toothpastes – these toothpastes do not move tartar deposits per se; rather, they work to remove as much plaque as possible to prevent further tartar buildup. Some manufacturers claim that this type may also work to soften the deposits.

  • Whitening Toothpastes – if you’re looking to give your smile a little bit of sparkle, then this type of toothpaste is your best bet. Whitening toothpastes have more abrasives than ordinary toothpastes, allowing them to be more effective in removing surface stains. Some may also have bleaching ingredients like peroxides, or polishing agents that makes the teeth shinier.

Take note that whitening toothpastes are intended only to restore the natural color of your teeth. It won’t make your teeth any whiter than its natural shade.

  • Desensitizing Toothpastes – this type is prescribed for individuals who experience sensitivity, either as a result of tooth decay or gum disease.

Desensitizing toothpastes contain compounds that work to physically block the exposed tubules of the tooth. These tubules connect directly to the nerves in the pulp, causing sensitivity. Blocking these tubules brings quick relief from sensitivity.

Which Type of Toothpaste is the Best?

The best toothpaste for you depends on what your oral health needs are. But no matter which one you choose or which one your dentist prescribes, always make sure that it has a seal of approval by the American Dental Association.

Caring For Your Toothbrush

A good oral hygiene plays the most important role in taking care of your pearly whites. But to keep your teeth healthy for longer, you also have to do proper care and maintenance of one of the tools that helps you do so – your toothbrush.

Here are some general considerations on how to take care of your favorite oral hygiene buddy, as recommended by the American Dental Association (ADA).

NEVER Share Your Toothbrush with Anyone.

The oral cavity is loaded with millions of microorganisms that may potentially cause infections, both oral and systemic. And these could be transferred to your toothbrush during use.

Sharing your toothbrush with anyone results in the exchange of these microorganisms between users, putting everyone at risk for infections. But individuals with compromised or weakened immune systems or have existing infections are at greater risk.

Rinse Your Toothbrush Thoroughly After Every Use.

Rinse your toothbrush under running water after brushing to wash off any remaining toothpaste and other debris.

Some individuals soak their toothbrush in an antibacterial mouthwash, while others use commercially-available sanitizing solutions for toothbrushes. Both methods are acceptable. A dishwasher may also be used, but not for long periods.

Allow Your Toothbrush to air-dry After Rinsing.

Put your toothbrush in an upright position and let it air-dry until your next use. If two or more toothbrushes are stored in the same holder, keep them apart to prevent cross-contamination.

Avoid storing your toothbrush in closed containers. A closed container provides moist environment which is conducive for growth of microorganisms.

Use Proper Brushing Techniques.

How well you care for your toothbrush is just as important as the care you give your teeth. When you brush, do it gently using short strokes instead of long, hard strokes. Vigorous brushing makes the bristles get worn easily.

Replace Your Toothbrush Every 3 to 4 Months.

Even if you follow all the tips given above, they would still be useless if you don’t replace your toothbrush on a regular basis.

The ADA recommends getting a new toothbrush every 3 to 4 months or as soon as the bristles start to look worn and discolored from everyday use. Worn toothbrushes clean much less effectively, particularly on areas where plaque accumulates the most – underneath the gums and in between the teeth.

Now, the rates at which toothbrushes wear out depend on factors unique to every individual.

Check your toothbrush regularly, look out for signs of wear, and replace as needed. Even if you don’t see any obvious signs of wear and tear, you still need to change your toothbrush regularly because they often have microorganisms which can build up to significant levels over time.

Children’s toothbrushes may need to be replaced more frequently than adult brushes. Also, you may have to replace your toothbrush much sooner if you get colds or other viral infection.

But no matter how often you get a new toothbrush, replacing them ensures that you have a clean, efficient brush that will optimally clean your teeth and provide you with a healthy smile for life.

Top Tooth Brushing Tips to Help You Out

Brushing your teeth seems a very easy task. In fact, it is practically a second nature for most of us. But is there a right or wrong way of brushing your teeth? Or do electric toothbrushes clean better than their manual counterparts? Or how often should I brush my teeth?

Learn the answers to these important questions, along with other useful tips in this article.

Choosing the Right Toothbrush

Toothbrushes come in various forms – there’s your good old manual toothbrush, and there’s the more advanced electric ones. And to take good care of your mouth, you have to choose one that’s right for you.

According to studies, there’s not much difference in the effectiveness of manual and electric toothbrushes; rather, what’s more important is that you are comfortable in using it.

One important reminder, though, is to choose a brush that has soft bristles. Some people think that harder bristles clean better, but they actually don’t. In fact, harder bristles can wear your teeth faster while soft bristles clean more effectively. That’s because soft bristles are flexible and can bend right under the gums to loosen up any plaque that has accumulated in there.  

The Proper Method

There are different brushing methods prescribed for different cases. But in general, the proper way of brushing is done by, first, pointing the bristles of your toothbrush towards the gumline. These allow the tip of the bristles to go underneath and gums and loosen the deposits there.

When brushing, don’t do it roughly. This is another mistake that most of us do.

Instead of vigorous strokes, use a gentle vibrating motion so you can massage the gums at the same time. Count one to twenty, then do a sweeping motion from the gumline towards the biting surface of the teeth.

After brushing, be sure to clean your tongue as well. Most manual toothbrushes come with a tongue scraper at the back.

Scrape your tongue to get rid of the bacteria that cause bad breath.

The Recommended Frequency

Theoretically, brushing once a day is already enough as long as you’re doing it right. After all, plaque matures and starts to wreak havoc on your oral tissues after 48 hours. But just to be sure, dentists recommend twice a day brushing or brushing every after meals.

The Prescribed Duration

It sure takes time to brush your teeth well. The American Dental Association recommends brushing your teeth for at least two minutes, and then flossing all the in-between surfaces of your teeth.

Use a timer to mark the 2-minute period. Better yet, listen to your favorite song and brush until it ends.

Changing your Toothbrush

A good toothbrush can sometimes be hard to give up. However, according to the American Dental Association you have to replace your toothbrush every 3 to 4 months or as soon as the bristles start to look worn. You also have to change after having colds or any viral infection, as viruses can persist in your toothbrush for many days.

So now that you have these tips, be sure to follow them. If you need additional tips or help on how to properly brush your teeth or anything about oral hygiene for that matter, consult your dentist.

Learn All About Mouthrinses

When you hear the term “oral hygiene,” the first thing that probably comes to your mind is tooth brushing. Tooth brushing, coupled with flossing, are the main methods of keeping your teeth and mouth healthy. But did you know that even with the combined effect of these mechanical cleaning, they still do not clean your mouth 100%? This is where mouthrinses come in.

What Are Mouthrinses?

A mouthrinse is an oral hygiene adjunct that helps maintain your oral health. It effectively reach areas that both brushing and flossing can’t. It is also a great aid for patients who can’t brush their teeth due to dexterity problems.

What Type Of Mouthrinses Are Available?

Despite the numerous varieties of mouthrinses available in your supermarket or drugstore, there are actually only two types of them – fluoride and antibacterial mouthrinses.

Fluorides mouthrinses help strengthen the teeth, making it more resistant to acid attacks that lead to tooth decay; hence, they are also called anti-cavity mouthrinses.

Antibacterial mouthrinses, on the other hand, kill the bacteria that cause tooth decay, gum disease, bad breath, and other oral health problems. An example of this type would be the chlorhexidine mouthrinses, which is prescribed for patients with severe form of gum disease.

Most mouthrinses today are both anti-cavity and antibacterial. Before choosing which kind suits your needs, be sure to consult your dentist first to avoid using one that is ineffective for the oral health problem you’re trying to get rid of.

What Is The Proper Way Of Using Mouthrinses?

To be effective, the mouthrinse must be in contact with your teeth and gums for as long as possible. Instructions for use are printed at the back of the bottle, but most patients ignore these, resulting to decreased effectiveness of the mouthrinse.

But for the benefit of everyone, here is the proper way of using your mouthrinses:

1) Dispense a correct amount of the mouthrinse. Most of them come with a small cup that you can use to measure the proper amount.

2) Swish the mouthrinse vigorously around your mouth for about 30-60 seconds.

3) Spit out the solution and use a new one to rinse your mouth. Spit out the solution. You may also use water for rinsing, but the suggested method allows the mouthrinse to continue working for a little bit longer.

4) If you choose the mouthrinse for rinsing, avoid eating or drinking anything for at least 10 minutes.

If you use mouthrinse that contain hydrogen peroxide or alcohol, rinsing with water after using the solution is recommended.

Allowing these kinds of mouthrinses to persist in the mouth may cause irritation, dryness, and other problems.

When to Use – Before or After Brushing?

This is the one big question that has always raised a debate. There are logical arguments for both sides, and there’s not a single study which proves that one is more effective over the other.

Those who prefer using mouthrinses before tooth-brushing argue that mouthrinses helps loosen up plaque deposits and other debris, making them much easier to remove through brushing.

However, the other side opposed this, saying that the short amount of time the mouthrinse is in contact with the teeth is not enough to loosen anything. They added that using mouthrinses after brushing helps disinfect the mouth after all the plaque deposits and debris have been cleared.

Furthermore, it gives you the option of leaving residual mouthrinse in your mouth, providing it with more time to exert its effect.

Are There Any Safety Concerns With The Use Of Mouthrinses?

Mouthrinses undergo the same clinical testing and quality control as other medicine, so you can be sure that they are safe.

Nonetheless, it is advised that you consult your dentist first because using them, especially fluoride mouthrinses because excessive use of such may actually be damaging to the teeth.

And while mouthrinses have been proven to be effective for their given purpose, always keep in mind that they should not replace mechanical cleaning by brushing and flossing. Instead, mouthrinses should only be used as an adjunct.

Top 5 Home Remedies for Bad Breath

Visiting your dentist on a regular basis, along with meticulous oral hygiene, is the key to oral health.

For embarrassing oral health issues like bad breath, however, you can actually fix it at the comfort of your own home instead of going to your dentist right away.

Again, good oral hygiene is (and will always be) the number one remedy, but you can do a whole lot more than that. Here are some home remedies to help you out.

Probiotics

When you suffer from bad breath, one of the first things you probably do is reach for that bottle of mint-flavored mouthwash. And while the mint can help make your mouth feel and smell fresh in an instant, it is only a temporary fix.

The thing about mouthwash is that they tend to kill both good and bad bacteria in your mouth. So here comes a much better solution – probiotics. Probiotics work by shifting the ratio of good and bad bacteria in your mouth which, in turn, leads to better health.

The best example of a probiotic-rich food is yogurt. To use it as remedy, try swishing it all around your mouth.

Cinnamon

Cinnamon consists of an essential oil called cinnamic aldehyde, which helps fight bad breath by reducing the amount of bad bacteria in the mouth.

Make a cinnamon mouthwash by adding a teaspoon of cinnamon powder to a cup of boiling water. Mix in some bay leaf and cardamom seeds. Allow for a few minutes to infuse, then strain. Use the solution as a mouth rinse twice a day.

Cloves

Like cinnamon, cloves also have that antibacterial benefit that helps get rid of the foul odor. There are two ways to use this as home remedy.

You can chew whole pieces of cloves or make them into a tea that you can rinse your mouth with.

To make clove tea, add a teaspoon of ground clove into boiling water, and simmer for about 5 minutes.

Lemon Juice

The use of lemon juice in bad breath has been known for generations already. This acidic fruit can prevent the growth of bacteria, while at the same time masking the foul odor with its strong, pleasant smell.

Prepare this home remedy by stirring in a tablespoon of lemon juice in a cup of water. You may add some salt for better effects.

Not only will the solution solve bad breath itself, but it shall address dry mouth as well.

Apple Cider Benefits

Apple cider vinegar has many health benefits and fighting bad breath is one of them. Aside from being an antibacterial, it also has some pH-balancing properties.

To use it as home remedy, mix a tablespoon of raw apple cider vinegar into a glass of water. You may use it as a gargle or drink it before meals. Drinking the mixture shall help cure bad breath by improving your digestion.

If you don’t notice any improvement after a few weeks of trying these remedies, you may now seek your dentist and/or physician for help. Sometimes, the cause of bad breath goes beyond poor oral hygiene.

Learn more about the possible causes of bad breath in this article.

Orthodontic Retainers: FAQs

If you have or have had dental braces, then like many people, one of the things that you very much look forward to is that day when your dentist finally gets them off. So you come to your dentist’s clinic for your de-bonding appointment and just like that, your teeth are perfect.

But before you can celebrate, you dentist suddenly ruins your perfectly happy moment by saying that you need to put on your retainers now.

Yes, we know the feeling, but don’t get disappointed yet because it is for your own good. Learn more about orthodontic retainers and how they can help your now perfect teeth stay that way.

What are Orthodontic Retainers?

Simply put, an orthodontic retainer, as its name suggests, is custom-made appliance that retains your teeth to their new position after the removal of your dental braces. There are different types of retainers, and you can learn more about them in this article.

Why would I need an Orthodontic Retainer?

Having your braces off doesn’t mean that the whole process of tooth movement is done. The forces that moved your teeth into their perfect alignment will take some time to stop.

If you don’t use retainers, then these forces will continue moving your teeth even after the braces are removed, causing them to be misaligned again.

Also, it may take a while for supporting structures (i.e. bone and periodontal ligament) to remember the new position of your teeth and adapt to other changes.

How do Orthodontic Retainers work?

Retainers prevent further tooth movement basically by acting as “brake” which stops the forces cause the movement. They signal the tooth roots to stay in place, which thereby preserve the correct alignment created by your dental braces.

How long do I have to wear an Orthodontic Retainer?

Orthodontists recommend wearing a retainer for at least six months after the removal of your dental braces. You must wear your retainer exactly as your orthodontist say especially during the first six months. This period is very critical because it is when tooth movement is still active.

Depending on the case, some patients are even required to wear their retainers for life after the critical period. But don’t worry, if you happen be one of them, you would only need to wear them at night.  You can walk around and spend your entire daytime without your retainers.

 How do I take care of my Orthodontic Retainer?

Your retainers should be cleaned every night by rinsing it with warm water, or with cleaners that are especially formulated for retainers. Denture cleaners also work. Some retainers can also be cleaned by brushing them using a soft-bristled toothbrush and tiny amount of toothpaste – ask your orthodontist if your retainer is suitable for this method.

If you wear your retainer 24/7, be sure to clean it every now and then to prevent bacterial buildup.

Wearing your retainers is a must, especially if you wouldn’t want your teeth to go back to their pre-treatment state. Majority of adults who need orthodontic treatment are actually patients whose condition has relapsed because they did not wear their retainers.

Always follow your orthodontist’s recommendations to make sure that all the time and resources you’ve spent for your orthodontic treatment will all be worth it.

5 Health Problems That Can Be Solved by Orthodontics

Most people think that dental braces and other forms of orthodontic treatment only work to fix and improve one’s smile. No one can blame them – after all, it is a dental treatment. But there are actually some medical problems that can be addressed by having your teeth straightened by those wires and brackets. Find out the most common health problems that can be alleviated by orthodontic treatment.

Temporomandibular Joint Problems

The temporomandibular joint, or simply TMJ, pertains the joint connecting your lower jaw to the rest of the head. A patient who suffers from malocclusion or wrong bite can also experience TMJ problems because the wrong relationship of the upper and lower teeth can also cause the misalignment of the jaw.

This is manifested by pain in the jaw and around the ear area, and discomfort when chewing. Orthodontic treatment like dental braces which help put the teeth into their proper alignment, in turn, can help correct jaw alignment as well. This helps get rid of all the negative symptoms mentioned.

Headaches and Neck Pain

The head and neck area consists of a complex, yet delicate network of bones, joints, muscles, and tendons that have to work together in harmony for optimum function. And any imbalance in this network results to chronic headaches and neck pain.

If you experience reoccurring pain in the head and neck area that doesn’t seem to go away with your OTC pain meds warrant a visit to a specialist. Your dentist and/or orthodontist are some of the specialists you must consider especially if the pain is originating from behind the eyes, on the temple, or at the back of the head. You dentist or orthodontist will help determine if the pain is related to your teeth and orthodontic treatment could be the answer.

Sleep Disorders

Difficulty sleeping may result from both TMJ problems and pain in the head and neck. If you jaws are misaligned, chances are, you’ll have trouble sleeping due to breathing problems. If left untreated, the breathing problem may get worse over time. By correcting the alignment of the teeth, breathing will improve, giving you longer and more restful sleep.

Heart Problems

Individuals with malocclusion often have crowded teeth that make oral hygiene a bit of a challenge. If you can’t clean your teeth well, the inability to adequately remove plaque deposits can result to gum disease, starting with gingivitis.

Over time, unmanaged gingivitis can advance to a more severe form of gum disease – periodontitis. Numerous studies have proven the link between periodontitis and heart problems.

Having your teeth in their proper alignment will make cleaning them much easier and, in the process, prevent periodontal disease and heart problems.

If you have any of the health issues above, one probable solution would be visiting your dentist or orthodontist to determine if it is your teeth that’s causing your malady. Your dentist or orthodontist can devise a treatment plan that will help alleviate these problems.

Interesting Facts About Dental Sealants

In the past few years, more and more individuals are starting to realize the importance of getting dental sealants on their teeth.

A dental sealant is a barrier placed on tooth surfaces that are most susceptible to decay.

These include, most especially, the biting surface of the molars, which has lots of small grooves where bacteria can accumulate and cause destruction.

If you wonder what dental sealants are, here are some basic (and interesting) facts about sealants and how they can help protect the teeth.

Dental sealants protect the teeth from cavities

Even if you brush your teeth thoroughly twice a day, it doesn’t mean that you are safe from developing cavities.

It’s simply because the bristles of your toothbrush don’t reach the small pits and grooves on your teeth, making them an ideal niche for bacteria to grow, multiply, and wreak havoc.

Dental sealants help solve this problem by covering these small grooves with a tooth-colored plastic material. This blocks the accumulation of bacteria and in turn, their ability to attack and destroy the tooth enamel.

Dental sealants are suitable for any age

Contrary to what many people believe, dental sealants are not only for children.

While it is true that they are done mostly in children, sealants are actually are suitable for any age because the permanent teeth of older patients are also riddled with small grooves that need to be covered.

Dental sealants are quick and painless to apply

Applying dental sealants is much faster compared to putting restorations, be it complex or simple restorations.

The procedure is also absolutely pain-free, making it a very suitable procedure even for very young children.

Unlike restorations where the dentist has to use a dental drill to remove tooth structure, sealants only require cleaning and drying of the tooth surface so that the material will stick tightly to it. The entire procedure will only take a couple of minutes.

Dental sealants last long

Dental sealants can last for years depending on the patient’s oral hygiene practices and eating habits.

But then again, this extra layer of protection should not make you think that going to the dentist is not needed anymore.

In fact, you still have to do regular visits so your dentist can check if your sealants are still intact or if they need to be replaced already.

Dental sealants will help you save money

In addition to being absolutely fast and painless, dental sealants are also much cheaper than restorations. And the best thing is, most dental insurance companies include sealants in the list of treatments they cover.

Why spend on expensive tooth fillings when you can prevent the need for them in the first place – at a fraction of the cost!

While sealants can indeed do a great job in protecting your teeth, getting one should not make you forget that good oral hygiene practices, regular dental visits, and healthy are also critical in maintaining the health of your teeth and oral cavity.

5 Biggest Causes of Tooth Sensitivity

Do you find yourself wincing every time you eat your ice-cold treat? Or perhaps when you brush or floss your teeth?

You could be experiencing tooth sensitivity. You don’t have to worry, though, as there are lots of things you can do to lessen this discomfort.

Among them is knowing what the most common causes are, so you can avoid them and prevent tooth sensitivity from occurring in the first place.

Vigorous Toothbrushing

Toothbrushing is good for your oral health, but doing it with too much gusto can actually be harmful to your teeth.

Vigorous brushing can wear down the tooth enamel and expose the dentin underneath it. The dentin consists of small tubules that connect directly to the pulp, which contains nerves.

When these tubules are exposed to extreme heat or cold, the nerves are stimulated resulting to tooth sensitivity. To avoid thinning out your enamel, brush more gently using a soft-bristled toothbrush.

Acidic Foods

Acidic foods can also wear down the tooth enamel just like vigorous brushing does.

The only difference between the two is that acids cause chemical dissolution, while brushing causes mechanical wearing.

You don’t have to stay away from these foods. Instead, you can just rinse your mouth with water right after eating any acidic food to wash away the acids and limit their contact with your teeth. And be sure to wait for at least 30 minutes before brushing your teeth.

The dissolution caused by the acid plus the mechanical action of your brush will only make the problem even worse.

Bruxism

Again, even though the enamel is the hardest and strongest substance in the body, it can easily be worn down by various mechanical factors.

One is vigorous brushing, and another is by bruxism or tooth grinding. It causes sensitivity in the same way as the first two.

To solve this oral habit, consult your dentist for recommendations and fabrication of a protective mouth-guard that you can use at night.

Gum Disease

Gum disease, caused by excessive accumulation of plaque on tooth surface, lead to gum recession and exposure of the tooth roots.

Unlike your tooth crown which has hard, strong enamel to protect it, the cementum covering the tooth root is softer and therefore more prone to dissolution and mechanical wear.

In such case, your dentist will manage the underlying problem first then prescribe something that will help seal your teeth.

Dental Treatment

It is not uncommon to experience some sensitivity after undergoing certain dental procedures. These include professional cleaning, placement of restorations, root canal treatment, or even extraction.

The sensitivity induced by these procedures can last for a couple of days and should not be a cause of concern because it will go away on its own.

However, if the symptom persists and/or gets worse, contact your dentist immediately. Only your dentist will know what to do and give the best advice for your particular situation.

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